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20120925
20121003
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)
. >> you know, one thing that really struck me was his involvement in the civil rights. i look at the country today, there are so many people that don't know the history, have no clue about the history of civil rights. here is your father speaking very passionately about a young black student who had been admitted to the university of mississippi. they were protesting on the grounds. they did not want james meredith there. your father was talking to the governor about that. >> we got to get order up there. that's what we thought was going to happen. >> mr. president, please, why don't you stop -- >> how can i remove him governor when there's a riot in the street and he might step out of the building and something -- let's get order up there and then we can do something. >> we've got to get somebody out there to get order and stop the firing and the shooting. then you and i will talk on the phone about meredith. first we've got to get order. >> he's really mad. i know the tone from my aunts and uncles. civil rights went from being important but not a heated issue during his pres
moving and revealing than as the secret witness to the struggle for civil rights. the great moral issue tearing the country apart. and after a young man named james meredith creates a crisis by enrolling in the all-white university of mississippi. >> mr. president, please, why don't you, can't you give an order. >> how can i remove him, governor, when there's a riot in the streets. >> i took an oath. >> the problem, is governor, i've got my responsibilities just like you have yours. >> reporter: kennedy sent in the u.s. marshals and the national guard to restore order, and james meredith became the first black graduate of ole miss. then 11 days before he is assassinated -- >> tuesday, november 12th. >> the last words on the last tape are about the hard battle ahead. >> and so our lot becomes more difficult. >> our lot becomes more difficult. and that's it. last word. >> i love that. i think that's really -- i thought that was really moving. and obviously, knowing what happened. he understood how difficult all of this really was. >> wow. >> just fascinating stuff. 260 hours worth of the
know, he gets a lot of grief on civil rights. and it's true he did not use the bully pulpit. he could have done a better job on that. but he was a subtle guy. he desegregated d.c. when people weren't watching. he desegrated the armed wt tr. appointed all the federal judges that desegregated the south. he believed in moving, as john was saying, with a hidden hand. that's true on civil rights as well. he's been unfairly criticized for being weak on civil rights. he was not as strong as he could havebeen, but he did ts poant. w >> let's talk, presidential historian, jon meacham, who has a book coming out after the election that's forthcoming. "thomas jefferson, t.j." ike, a good president? a ar great president? or a great president? think that he -- one of the things we haven't talked about on the domestic side is he ratified what franklin roosevelt and harry truman had done in that he could have created --n 1952, 3,it cle,think, and check me on this, evan, was such that if he had been really intent on rolling back the new deal and the fair deal, it would ve been a huge fight and would h
in the civil rights movement. so many people fought s i could express my views and vote and have a say. i never want to take that for granted. not as a celebrity but as an american. >> we just showed the brief clip of youpegth convention. >> i was really nervous. i get paid to be other people for a living. to speak as other people. as the convention i was speaking as myself in a room that big and the stakes are so high in this election. i ft like ias a trendous ho a a big responsibility. i kind of prefer being other people. >> that's an incredible room. energy in there. you get off one line and you feel the energy come back to you and it kind of builds. >> rlly exciting. >> i think we have a clipfou ki le listen. >> today there are people out there trying to take away rights that our mothers, our grandmothers and our great grandmothers fought for. rights that we fought fo ourigote our right to choose. our right to affordable, quality education. equal pay. access to health care. and we, the people, cannot l th en ow about that, mike barnicle. sign her up. >> when you watched yourself, you said y
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)